Mistress Tissa on Coalition Radio rescheduled to Friday, August 7, 9:45PM EST

Listening is easy. Just follow the link in the tweet.

Mistress Tissa on Coalition Radio on Friday, July24, 9:45PM EST – POSTPONED

[Clean link is here]

The interview will be loosely structured, so I’m unsure about everything that will be discussed, but some topics mentioned are: power dynamics in BDSM, “topping from the bottom”, the influence of Patriarchy on BDSM and gender play, and more.

It will be a live video feed.

UPDATE: Due to my illness, this discussion will be postponed. A new date will be announced shortly.

Interview about SESTA with Swedish Radio

I was interviewed by Olivia Wikström from Swedish Radio about SESTA.

The clip is here: Mistress Tissa on Swedish Radio

Here’s the translation of the text on the site (not the full transcript):

The new US law SESTA punishes sites if someone is exposed to trafficking there. But many sex workers believe the law will fail.

SESTA, the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act, is a new law in the United States that wants to deal with online trafficking by making the sites themselves responsible for their presence. So now people behind sites can be punished with large fines or imprisonment if it is discovered.

This raises concern with sex workers, partly because it can limit what we can say about sex online, because no one will dare let it be there. In part, they mean that the law forces an exposed group in an even more vulnerable situation.

Removing these platforms will increase the proportion of people taking risky decisions about their jobs.

Mistress Tissa, dominatrix

With the help of the network, those who work with sex and eroticism can volunteer do more research on their clients and not expose themselves to the same risk as walking the streets.”

 

 

Mistress Tissa in Playboy article about FOSTA/SESTA

I’m included in an article about FOSTA/SESTA written by Graeme McMillan for Playboy.

You can read it here: The President’s War on Online Sex Work

Interview with Coalition Radio

On Friday the 16th, I was interviewed by Pat of Coalition Radio. In the interview, I discuss the SESTA bill. I touch on various related issues, but focus on what I believe are the psychosocial origins of the legislation.

You can listen here:

(This is an hour-long interview. Those who have attention issues [raises hand] may find it more palatable to listen to it in smaller chunks.)

Interview with Coalition Radio tonight

Tonight from 8 – 9pm , I will be speaking with Coalition Radio about the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act (SESTA), S. 1693.

You can stream the broadcast for free by going to their website!

 

 

Interview with Reluctantly Adult

I was recently interviewed by the lovely Charmel Sippio of Reluctantly Adult. To listen to My interview, please visit the site: Reluctantly Adult: Mistress Tissa

Update: The iReluctantlyAdult website has since gone offline. However, I uploaded a copy of the interview on My site. It’s located on the bottom of My About page.

Note: I want to clarify some points that have come up with regard my interview. That is the way that “prostitution” is presented and discussed here. First of all, people usually don’t use the word “prostitute” unless it is pejorative; the more common way to describe this work is “sex work”, which I do mention in the interview, but do not advocate for as a preferred term. (My usage of the term was not with pejorative intent.) Before the interview was aired, I was not told the interview would be framed as a way which sounds like it’s about putting Dominatrices against “prostitutes”, when some people have different approaches to the work they do and blend professions. Once the interview was aired, I tried to express my concern for the title, but I didn’t do a good enough job explaining why I felt it was problematic. Another issue is — and I feel especially badly about this — is that by not advocating for all sex workers (which I have actually done multiple times in the past), which includes my belief that all forms of erotic and sex work should be legal, that I almost appear to encourage more stigmatization of this work. The irony is not lost on me. That said, I do believe that a distinction in services is necessary and valid, and that we should all have the right to identify in ways which is comfortable for us and clear to our clientele. Still, I apologize for any errors on my part and for not being clear about the above points.